Category Archives: Programming

Facebook Mosaic 2.0: Painting with social data

Facebook Mosaic is a platform I developed to allow people to create art using their social data. My current work is highly focused around capturing and visualizing social data to provide utility to the masses. We upload an extensive amount of data to our social networking sites every day, however we, for the most part, can only view that data in the prescriptive context of our virtual social networks i.e. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. My goal is to find ways to capture this data and visualize it in ways that can actually improve our day-to-day lives.

Although Facebook mosaic may not achieve that goal, the development process was crucial to my understanding of what it takes to query various social networks and make use of the information returned. It also gave me a chance to use my creative side to develop something fun and interactive. You can use Facebook Mosaic to generate images with you social data by visiting the website.

Here is a statement I wrote for the piece:

As an Electronic Artist I am always looking for ways to re-contextualize the role technology plays in our lives. Facebook Mosaic is a program that takes three profile pictures from a user’s Facebook news feed, and blends them together dynamically using one color channel from each photo.

Many of us use Facebook daily to communicate and share with friends and family, locally, and around the world. This forum has become a global “water cooler,” with a reach not bound by time or space. As a result, we are forced to think about our interactions in an entirely different way.

Although there is a distinct level of separation between our “real” selves and our profile, Facebook provides a melting pot for our ideas and identities to blend together like a large mosaic with many facets coming together to create a dynamic collaborative whole. My goal with this piece is to frame this abstract concept in a concise, playful fashion so as to depict our social interactions as works of art.

Mind Chimes

Today I debuted my new interactive dome piece, Mind Chimes at ARTS Lab, UNM. The piece generates visuals and music from a live brainwave feed captured by a NeuroSky MindWave Mobile headset. I coded the entire piece with MaxMSP and used vDome, an open source Max based dome player, to skin it to the dome. The audio is generated by sending MIDI notes from my brainwave synth to Camel Audio’s Alchemy MIDI synth instruments. The visuals are generated by the notes played from the audio. They change colors based on your state of mind. This is a great first iteration and I look forward to building it out further.

There’s no good way to capture a dome piece with standard video but here’s a little clip I shot of my friend going to town with his mind.

SolePower: Autonomous Energy Generation

This proposal was a collaboration between Chris Clavio (myself) and Ruben Olguin and was submitted to the Prix Ars Electronica [The Next Idea] competition for judgement by a jury. If selected the proposal will be realized and installed at the 2013 Ars Electronica Festival.

This electronic arts project incorporates engineering, computer science, and creativity with the intention of creating a practical survival solution in tandem with a social dialogue about the way we generate, access, and transport electricity. The technology, at its root, integrates piezoelectric circuits into the sole of a shoe to generate electricity, which can then be used to charge mobile devices.

Hacking Necomimi – Part 1

For this project I am hacking a pair of Necomimi Brainwave Cat Ears so I can control some visualizations in a immersive dome environment.

I finally got a processing sketch up that allows me to control a servo over Bluetooth by moving my mouse on the screen. It’s a bit laggy, but it works. This is the first step to hacking the Necomimi because if I can control a servo over Bluetooth I can also monitor a servo’s angle and get the data back back over Bluetooth. Essentially I reverse engineered what I need to get data from the Necomimi to control my visualizations.

Virtual Traffic

Virtual Traffic is an interactive art installation that composites pedestrian foot traffic at five high-density areas of the UNM campus into a comprehensive shared experience.

Cameras simultaneously capture pedestrians at five high traffic locations, and custom software composites the videos together. Different blending effects activate based on traffic density, direction, and position of the pedestrians in the space. This facilitates a virtual interaction between the people in each space, and helps us begin to understand our daily commute in a new way.

Facebook Mosaic

As an Electronic Artist I am always looking for ways to recontextualize the role technology plays in our lives. Facebook Mosaic is a program I wrote that takes three profile pictures from a Facebook news feed, and blends them together dynamically using one color channel from each photo.

Many of us use Facebook daily to communicate and share with friends and family around the world. This forum has become the new “watercooler,” but with a reach not bound by time or space. This new reach and mode of interaction presents us with new ways to think about identity.

Although there is a level of separation between our “real” selves and our profile, Facebook provides a melting pot for our identities to blend together like a large mosaic with many pieces from different people coming together to create a dynamic collaborative whole. My goal with this piece was to represent this abstract concept in a simple, playful, and interactive way.

Move the cursor from right to left over the image to change the mosaic pixel size. You can also use the letters ‘a’ ‘d’ and ‘f’ to isolate the three individual images. Pressing the space bar loads a new mosaic. Currently, the pool of photos is a preset lot of 276. The next iteration will have a Facebook login that will allow users to pull photos directly from their live feed. Have fun seeing what mosaics you can create.

Create a Facebook Mosaic Now!

     

vLamp

vLampvLamp is a simple test project that I created with Processing. It uses the light sensor on your MacBook Pro to turn the lamp on when it gets dark and off when it gets light again. Have fun turning the lights in the room on and off or just wave your hand in front of your webcam if you’re lazy.

Download vLamp Now! (Mac only)